Marc Beer’s Vast Experience With Medical Start-Up Development Offers Unique Insights

With 25 years’ of successful experience in the development of pharmaceutical, diagnostic, biotech and medical devices under his belt, a lot of people stop and listen when Marc Beer has something to say. His more than two decades on the cutting edge of creating innovative and life-saving medical devices gives him a perspective that few others in this industry can match.

 

Marc Beer is currently Chairman, CEO, and Co-founder of Renovia, a medical device company that makes devices designed for the treatment of pelvic disorders in women. Renovia was launched in 2016. It produces a pelvic digital health system device called leva. It offers a new way for women to strengthen their pelvic floor muscles in the privacy of their homes.

 

The launch of Renovia follows a string of other successful start-ups masterminded by Marc Beer. He also founded LumeNXT, a collaborative effort with Medtronic. The cooperative effort created a surgical tool that leverages the power of LED illumination. Doctors use LumeNS to light up cavernous wounds to facilitate surgical procedures. 

 

Some of Marc Beer’s other experience includes serving as Chairman of Minerva Neuroscience, Good Start Genetics, and ViaCell.

 

In a recent interview, Marc Beer said he is in a constant state of looking for new technologies with the goal of helping patients. Making medical devices and pharmaceuticals that ease pain and save lives is immensely rewarding, he said.

 

Industry observers have described Marc Beer’s management style as “dynamic” and “always engaged.” His work as Chief Executive Officer for ViaCell is a prime example. His aggressive approach quickly grew the payroll of ViaCell to a robust operation of more than 300 employees.

 

When asked what skill he considered most important for someone working in his sector, Marc Beer said knowing how to generate capital for investment is key. He said an excellent executive must be a good manager of cash flow. He said innovation is exciting and important but that it “costs money.” Attracting investors and making them feel comfortable means establishing something he calls “cashflow positivity.” 

 

Marc Beer said he has observed many otherwise promising start-ups falter because they reached a point where progress was stalled by lack of cash flow. “They never get to flip the binary data card,” he said.

 

Marc Beer is proud of the fact that he has never started a company that ended up running out of funds. The ultimate tragedy of that, he said, is not just a failed business — it means that patients who need help with illnesses may never get the care they need.

 

Outside of work, Marc Beer likes to spend time with his children. That includes travel destinations shared by the whole family and appreciating the many cultural and historical amenities that grace his home in Boston. Learn more: https://www.facebook.com/people/Marc-Beer/100009146215501

 

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